Rhapsody of Courage

Rhapsody for Courage

to: Glenys

 .

And as I sat reading Billy Collins

all through this beautiful autumn morning,

I listened first to the lawnmower next door

struggling through an overgrown lawn.

And as I did so the clouds, which have

only just come on the scene, scudded by.

I was, though, in the middle of thinking

about this when disturbed by the cat,

who, as she washed,  did so

with a particularly raspy sound and shifted

a little with the sun; a sound I may not have

heard had the mover not ceased its strange music.

.

The cloud movement increased and I thought

about the music of the morning. How the music

of clouds scudding was so pure, so high above me

and yet so beautiful as to make something within

me sing. And now the cat who may or may not

be aware of this has slipped further into sleep;

the sky now a total blue and silence give me

its beauty, its own very special sound. And the

cat stretches one lone paw toward that shifting

span of sunlight.

.

The cat is still sleeping, the sun has shifted into

a corner of the room and begins an afternoon ascent

up the wall when the phone goes; a sibling with news.

.

And what would be the music in that you may ask (as

we see you have come back to the poem:)  though yes

I did leave the poem for a long conversation. I left off

reading Billy and carefully, sadly wrote the final stanzas.

.

Our youngest sister begins her radiation treatment today,

another is having a hip operation. So, I come back for both,

but especially for the sister who is in and out of chemo or

radiation treatments saying, every time;  “No long faces here.”

 

That’s so god-damn difficult because the music of the morning

is now so different and yet she makes it so necessary to write on

into the late noon with No Long Faces Here and she can, and she

does make this sound both musical and courageous. This is the music

I now hear. A rhapsody of courage. Then on request, No More Visitors.

And this is when silence is at it’s most strange. But for you

No Long Faces.

 .

Benita H. Kape © 4.5.2017

Standard

Tease and Torment – NaPoWriMo, day twenty-eight – prompt Skeltonic verse

storm clouds

Storm clouds over my street – southern hemisphere in May

Tease and Torment

.

Every awful wet day

the cruel month of May

will heavily out-weigh

the short and the stray

of autumn’s fresh breeze.

winter’s cool auxiliaries

chasing us all overseas;

we love the Hawaii’s.

.

Or we might travel on

to China or Taiwan.

Come with me, Juan,

I wish to prolong

a happy arrangement;

promising it well spent

tease and torment

cancel every dissent.

.

I see you are willing

Our hearts spinning

place of good feeling.

Good times are building

our cup is over-brimming

Nothing is missing.

Nothing is missing.

Nothing is missing.

Benita H. Kape © 27.4.2017

And now for our prompt (optional, as always). Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem using Skeltonic verse. Don’t worry, there are no skeletons involved. Rather, Skeltonic verse gets its name from John Skelton, a fifteenth-century English poet who pioneered the use of short stanzas with irregular meter, but two strong stresses per line (otherwise know as “dipodic” or “two-footed” verse). The lines rhyme, but there’s not a rhyme scheme per se. The poet simply rhymes against one word until he or she gets bored and moves on to another. Here is a good explainer of the form, from which I have borrowed this excellent example:

Standard

Horse Talk – NaPoWriMo 2017, Day eighteen – prompt: neoglogism/s

Horses out H.B. Memorial Lib. July 2014

Alert Ponies outside the city library. Ears raised like this indicate their alertness.

Horse Talk,

.

The voice raises and lowers;

depends on you

if you are attempting

to sound like a horse.

.

Hyyyrrrmmm, the sound

of a horse.  Therefore,

this is becoming a hymn

to a horse.

.

Hyyyrrrmmm! I am here

and I am happy to see you;

his head raised. Can you

read the language of ponies?

.

All horse snorts, sighs, and grunts

meanings to both horse and human.

.

But of course, they communicate

in many ways useful to such beautiful

creatures; hyyyrrrmmm.

.

They exude boredom by showing

one ear pointing forward and

the other pointing back.

.

All horse snorts, sighs, and grunts

meanings to both horse and human.

.

Watch those ears if they are stiff

and pointing forward. This indicates

your pony is alert. Not, in these moments,

his singsingsing hyyyrrrmmm.

.

All horse snorts, sighs, and grunts

meanngs to both horse and human.

.

Now, should his ears lie flat to his skull,

he is transmitting his profound displeasure.

.

Hyyyrrrmmm; his very best horse voice,

his stylish means of report. I am here,

I am a horse and I’m happy to see you.

Hyyyrrrmmm.

 

Benita H. Kape © 18.4.2017

And now for our (optional) prompt. Today, I challenge you to write a poem that incorporates neologisms. What’s that? Well, it’s a made-up word!

Standard

Twilight Cat – NaPoWriMo 2017 – Day nine – a nine line poem

 

glopo2017button2

Twilight Cat

Cat on bed 1

 

I am never alone in the evening hours

If Puss is not on my doorstep, I’ll call her.

She never waits for dark or the evening stars

Sometimes at twilight, she’ll come with a rush

Because every move I make indoors, she’ll decipher.

She has no tactics, no hidden ambush

Her evening ritual is usually to be mild and patient.

We always spend our evening hours together.

But mornings, to be outdoors, sees a new agreement.

 

Benita H. Kape © 9.4.2017

 

“Finally, here is our prompt (optional, as always). Because today is the ninth day of NaPoWriMo, I’d like to challenge you to write a nine-line poem. Although the fourteen-line sonnet is often considered the “baseline” form of verse in English, Sir Edmund Spenser wrote The Faerie Queene using a nine-line form of his own devising, and poetry in other languages (French, most particularly) has always taken advantage of nine-line forms. You can find information of various ways of organizing rhyme schemes, meters, etcetera for nine-line works here. And of course, you can always eschew such conventions entirely, and opt to be a free-verse nine-line poet.”

I have chosen to write a poetic form called a Nocturna. Nine lines, eight of which deal with the night and one with the morning.

Standard

For the Women of USA, a poem re-blogged, re-titled. The Battle Ahead of You.

The Battle Ahead of You – Fight On

 

Because today they need us –

today I  claim my connection

to America. And I do this

through my grandmamma

who left Scotland and settled

near Boston, U.S.A.

 

And having made my explanation

and, because on Inauguration Day, 2017,

it cannot be said, as did Richard Blanco

four years ago; For All of Us, One Today,

the poets not given a voice on the podium today,

therefore in this divided and techno savvy world

I have decided I will make a ‘Virtual’ march (my

second since the poorly attended Presidential

Inauguration late January, 2017). And I find myself

standing beside the women of America.

 

How was it so many seem to have forgotten

“Leaves of Grass?” Walt Whitman!

 

But hope – a constellation for Emily Dickinson, and –

that new hope raised by Richard Blanco; that kind

of hope, yes that kind of hope, is in the breast of many

and will be revived, podiums or no. Fight on. Fight on.

Benita H. Kape © 20.1.2016

Standard