Tease and Torment – NaPoWriMo, day twenty-eight – prompt Skeltonic verse

storm clouds

Storm clouds over my street – southern hemisphere in May

Tease and Torment

.

Every awful wet day

the cruel month of May

will heavily out-weigh

the short and the stray

of autumn’s fresh breeze.

winter’s cool auxiliaries

chasing us all overseas;

we love the Hawaii’s.

.

Or we might travel on

to China or Taiwan.

Come with me, Juan,

I wish to prolong

a happy arrangement;

promising it well spent

tease and torment

cancel every dissent.

.

I see you are willing

Our hearts spinning

place of good feeling.

Good times are building

our cup is over-brimming

Nothing is missing.

Nothing is missing.

Nothing is missing.

Benita H. Kape © 27.4.2017

And now for our prompt (optional, as always). Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem using Skeltonic verse. Don’t worry, there are no skeletons involved. Rather, Skeltonic verse gets its name from John Skelton, a fifteenth-century English poet who pioneered the use of short stanzas with irregular meter, but two strong stresses per line (otherwise know as “dipodic” or “two-footed” verse). The lines rhyme, but there’s not a rhyme scheme per se. The poet simply rhymes against one word until he or she gets bored and moves on to another. Here is a good explainer of the form, from which I have borrowed this excellent example:

Standard

Variety Makes the Taste Buds Grow Fonder – NaPoWriMo 2017, day twenty-seven -prompt: taste

DSC02057.JPG

Variety Makes the Taste Buds Grow Fonder

 .

Friday is a busy day for me.

Skipped breakfast, apart from a cup of tea

Though lunch was healthy,

Sticks of raw celery, apple, carrot, and peppers.

.

Friday is a busy day for me.

Now, what should I have for dinner?

Fish & chips, pie, and mushy peas?

No chance I’ll grow any thinner.

.

Friday’s a busy day for me.

Shopping and choir practice.

But late evening I indulge

Enjoying a few treats of chocolate.

Benita H. Kape © 27.4.2017

And last but not least, here’s our (optional) prompt! Many poems explore the sight or sound or feel of things, and Proust famously wrote about the memories evoked by smell, but today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that explores your sense of taste! This could be a poem about food, or wine, or even the oddly metallic sensation of a snowflake on your tongue.

Standard