A Young Country Mine

A young country mine;

streets on a grid, a line

many times copied from

cities a whole world away.

Streets on these grids, up

hills, around the shores;

but what was not replicated

was the cobbles, the old world.

A young country is mine

 

Benita Kape © 5.6.2018

Once again I try a Quadrille. This time the prompt is the word “cobble”

Quadrille #58 – Cobble us a Poem

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Autumn Poem

The Little Finch in Autumn

 

The little finch in autumn

lands on the supple rose stem

and a dance begins.

 

She is here to peck aphids

and with swift movement,

now seemingly she curls

into a ball.

 

How quickly she spins

around the stem,

all the time peck,

peck, peck.

The first rosehips,

baubles in this

delicate dance.

 

And just as quickly

it all comes to an end.

all I see now

is the bobbing stem.

 

Benita H. Kape © 8.5.2018

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Airport – first post (post – NaPoWriMo)

Airport

 /running through art galleries /

from: “If Katherine Mansfield Were

My Best Friend” by Nina Powles

 

We’d been to a Women’s Writers conference and you

and I now laughing, happy,  running,  into the airport.

Such behaviour not summoning the attention of security

guards in the ‘80’s.

 

We giggled silly, silly jokes in the face of the ticket seller;

(still not a security guard in sight). His embarrassment

so delicious we hugged, and I said I wanted to fly to

Invercargill with you, and you said you wanted to fly

to Gisborne with me.

 

Later, I sent a postcard. Only the once I ran laughing and

happy into airports holding your hand. I try not to giggle

when I see security guards.

 

Benita Kape © 2.5.2018

 

Note: Seems strange not to have written a poem yesterday. But they are always close to hand and memories bring up new ones.

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Trying to find Borges 30.4.2018 – NaPoWriMo

I’m not at all familiar with Borges but I gave it a go on a few things that came to me. But, as always, I stand to be corrected. He doesn’t seem to go by the maxim, “All poets are Cretans.” I don’t either but I wear the hat when it fits. Having had a repeat dream last night which was weird this was what I started with. Early in the evening, I dreamed my dead brother and his wife were having a big sale to get rid of pure rubbish. I woke, went back to sleep and then dreamed a similar dream. The basics were the same but the background and people totally different.

 

The Decider

“But broken images of nights treasure”

 

Take your time, the broken images may come together again.

But it is unlikely they will be the same.

Each night puts a new face on what the broken image might be.

You are always asking questions.

You are always asking us to ask questions.

You never say this history might be personal.

You also wrote, “The door does the choosing, not the man.”

Do we get to choose which images of nights’ treasure are the broken pieces, especially if we have already fitted them back together again?

I believe that’s all been decided a long time ago.

I’m trying to keep up with the categorical and the uncategorical.

I tried to keep to what seemed a rule: one thought, one line.

 

Benita Kape © 30.4.2018

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And for our final (optional) prompt, I’d like you to take your cue from Borges, and write a poem that engages with a strange and fascinating fact. It could be an odd piece of history, an unusual bit of art trivia, or something just plain weird. While I cannot vouch for the actual accuracy of any of the facts presented at the links above (or any other facts you might use as inspiration!), I can tell you that there are definitely some poetic ideas here, just waiting for someone to use them.

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Nail Air and Bone: Day 29.4.2018 NaPoWriMo – nearly there April.

window seat

 

Sylvia Plath wrote a poem about cutting off the tip of her thumb and that poem appears in Ariel. I’ve used the style she used for that poem. My poem may seem long but the stanzas are very short; the best way to write such an incident.  I titled my ‘thumb’ poem “Your Baby Thumb”. Not the kind of poem one expects to write for a three-year-old. There was no hinge by which the lid, when raised, would stay up of its own accord. Plus such lids are a hefty weight to come down on a little thumb resting on an opposite ledge. Another reason I called my poem “Your Baby Thumb” is because this thumb never gained its full adult length. I’ve seen some weird analysis of Plath’s poem, which incidentally is named “Cut”. None of that there here. Straight forward narrative is what I’ve gone for.

 

Your Baby Thumb

for: Sue

 

A child at play

a window seat lid

a slam, a scream.

 

No blood!

My own body

seems bereft of it too.

 

Look. This is what

you will see.

A mother’s quick searching

 

for a nobble of flesh;

among the boxes and books

in the cavern of a window seat.

 

Wrapped in clean cloth

a small hand

all that is left

 

above the top knuckle

of the child’s right thumb

is nail, air and bone.

 

And it was

never straight to A&E

first the GP

 

quick examination

and his nurse’s phone call

for a taxi.

 

Limp child in my arms —

through  tears

I stand on the edge

 

of the footpath

troubled I’d not found

that bulb of missing thumb half

 

but I’d had

no time to lose.

Kindness now pushes

 

it’s face

in my direction;

a stranger on the street.

 

Could she help?

Thank you, thank you

I explained as the taxi arrived.

 

I seem like

the child now

fainted away.

 

My child rushed

to theatre;

and what remains

 

of that small thumb

is stitched to the padding

in the palm of her hand

 

under her third finger.

It was Christmas

and our little girl

 

hospitalized,

thumb to palm stitched.

We visited.

 

Few children in the ward

that week,

but there was our

 

little accident prone,

survivor  daughter

defending herself

 

bashing any boy

who caused

her annoyance

 

with –

You guessed it!

Her roundly bandaged arm.

 

Whack, whack.

 

The tiny bulb

of dying thumb

was found.

 

Oh Sylvia.

 

I would never

let you write

about that.

 

Benita Kape © 29.4.2018

NaPoWriMo 2018 image

 

 

 

And now for our daily prompt (optional, as always). Today, we’d like to challenge you to write a poem based on the Plath Poetry Project’s calendar. Simply pick a poem from the calendar, and then write a poem that responds or engages with your chosen Plath poem in some way.

Happy writing!

 

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Caption: prose poem edited – postcard 28/29.4.2018

postcard 4.jpg Warming Up

Warming Up To Meet You

 Dear my good friend,

Girls, what were you walking into so generously and bursting with fun? Warming!  A caption flows following a period of war: their giggles framed as a preparation of some importance

You were warming up for families come together again after the war to end all wars. And, this is how, in such circumstances, you begin: a new sense of freedom infectious. A time capsule, unique and tender don’t you think?

With hindsight we feel that sense of sadness which will have been worn on those young shoulders; this capsule of time replaced as the beach belles move on into the fifties where a small revolution would come to hand.

Something they will call the New Look. Though as hemlines got longer (Caption appro: the proper hemline is 2 inches below the cellulite) the swimwear would lift and alter in shape. But let me not get ahead of myself, and the girls. Until then, fashion suffered those uninspiring designs, fabrics like jersey (wool) that would sag and pull out of shape.

Someone somewhere was about to make new inventions. The new decade of nylons and lastex, acetate: fabrics to firm and hold, the employ of boning in swimwear. (Now that wasn’t exactly freedom.) And there were paddings and ruching (still a favourite for the cover up of folds, both flesh and fabric.) For the very bold, bikinis. There were piping and polka dots and removable straps. Princess Lines and panties.

N.B. Dear friend,

And it all comes around again. What fell out of fashion comes back in. Only the caption remains out of date. This is not on my bucket list, nor yours I would think. How can I dissuade my eager daughter from setting up this online outdated fashion business, a mistake as she seeks ‘in’? Could you replicate this card to her minus a paragraph or two? Thank you.

Benita Kape © 28.4.2018

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This was Day 28 prompt

And now for our prompt (optional, as always). Following the suggestion of our craft resource, we challenge you today to draft a prose poem in the form/style of a postcard. If you need some inspiration, why not check out some images of vintage postcards? I’m particularly fond of this one.

Happy writing!

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Prose Poem – Caption: 28.4.2018 – NaPoWriMo

postcard 4.jpg Warming Up

Caption: Warming Up to Meet You Here

Since that strange mention of temperature, who would have guessed these were belles on a beach? And though it is strange that it is framed as a preparation of some import they pull it off: that new sense of freedom and they draw us marvellously into the fun. It is only with hindsight we feel a sense of sadness; know these beach belles have yet to move on to the fifties. They were warming up for families together again after a major war. And this is how, in such circumstances, they begin.  Oh, how fashion suffered then; uninspiring designs, fabrics like jersey (wool) that would sag and pull out of shape when it got wet.

Someone somewhere is about to make new inventions. The new decade of nylons and lastex, acetate: fabrics to firm and hold, the employ of boning in swimwear. (Now that wasn’t exactly freedom.) And there were paddings and ruching (still a favourite for the cover-up of folds: flesh or fabric.) For the very bold, bikinis. There were pipings and polka dots and removable straps. Princess Line and Panties.

And it all comes around again. What fell out of fashion comes back in. Only the caption remains out of date.

Benita Kape © 28.4.2018

glopo2018button2 

And now for our prompt (optional, as always). Following the suggestion of our craft resource, we challenge you today to draft a prose poem in the form/style of a postcard. If you need some inspiration, why not check out some images of vintage postcards? I’m particularly fond of this one.

Happy writing!

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